Newsletters for software developers

Software development is one of the professions where you just have to keep your knowledge up to date and follow what happens in the field. But as normal information overload is easily achieved so it’s beneficial to use for example curated newsletters for the subjects which intersects the stack you’re using and topics you’re interested at. Here are my selection of newsletters for software developers covering topics like web and mobile development, user experience and design and general topics. For more newsletters for developers you can check what for example Dzone wrote.

The power of newsletter lies in the fact that it can deliver condensed and digestible content which is harder to achieve with other good news sources like feed subscriptions and Twitter. Well curated newsletter to targeted audience is a pleasure to read and even if you forgot to check your newsletter folder, you can always get back to them later :)

General

Hacker Newsletter
Weekly newsletter of the best articles in Hacker News.

Status code
A language agnostic roundup of the latest ideas, releases, trends, events and must-read articles from the programming world (think C, UNIX, algorithms, editors, protocols)

Mobile development

iOS Dev Weekly
Hand picked round up of the best iOS development links published every Friday.

This Week In Swift
List of the best Swift resources of the week.

iOS Dev nuggets
Short iOS app development nugget every Friday/Saturday. Short and usually something you can read in a few minutes and improve your skills at iOS app development.

In depth Mac and iOS articles archives

Java

Java Web Weekly by Baeldung
Once-weekly email roundup of Java Web curated news by Eugen Baeldung.

The Java Specialists’ Newsletter
A monthly newsletter exploring the intricacies and depths of Java, curated Dr. Heinz Kabutz.

Java Performance Tuning News
A monthly newsletter focusing on Java performance issues, including the latest tips, articles, and news about Java Performance. Curated by Jack Shirazi and Kirk Pepperdine.

Database

DB Weekly
A weekly round-up of database technology news and articles covering new developments, SQL, NoSQL, document databases, graph databases, and more.

HTML and CSS

HTML5Weekly
Weekly HTML5 and Web Platform technology roundup. Curated by Peter Cooper.

CSS Weekly
Roundup of css articles, tutorials, experiments and tools. Curated by Zoran Jambor.

Web development

Web Development Reading List
Weekly roundup of web development–related sources, selected by Anselm Hannemann.

Versioning
SitePoint’s daily newsletter, which features the latest web development news.

Hacking UI
Newsletter for designers, front-end developers and product managers.

Scott Hanselman
Includes interesting and useful stuff Scott has found over the last few weeks and other wonderful things.

The Modern Web Observer
Biweekly email newsletter about current issues and trends in front-end web development. It is much like a commentory on the important current news and articles related to front end development.

Web Design Weekly
Links to the best news and articles to hit the interweb during the week.

MergeLinks
Weekly email of curated links to articles, resources, freebies and inspiration for web designers and developers.

For front-end developers there’s “How to keep up to date on
Front-End Technologies”
page which lists newsletters, blogs and people to follow.

JavaScript

JavaScript Weekly
Weekly e-mail round-up of JavaScript news and articles. Curated by Peter Cooper.

A Drip of JavaScript
“One quick JavaScript tip”, delivered every other Tuesday and written by Joshua Clanton.

SuperHero.js
Collection of the best articles, videos, and presentations on creating, testing, and maintaining a JavaScript code base.

Node Weekly
Once–weekly e-mail round-up of Node.js news and articles.

User experience and design

UX weekly
Five links each week with the best UX writing, process, analysis, and critique from around the web. Its content lies at the intersection of user experience design, game design, and tech industry critique.

GoodUI
Monthly newsletter where the author will share ideas on how to improve customer conversion and ease of use.

Sidebar.io
To satisfy your web aesthetics with list of the 5 best design links of the day. The content is manually curated by a couple great editors.

Userfocus
Updates you monthly about the happenings in the UX/usability arena.

UX Design Weekly
Best user experience design links every week, published every Friday.

Ops

DevOps Weekly
Weekly slice of devops news.

Web Operations Weekly
Weekly newsletter on Web operations, infrastructure, performance, and tooling, from the browser down to the metal.

Microservice Weekly
Weekly newsletter of articles regarding microservices.

Starting iOS development with Swift

Mobile application development differs between platforms and after doing couple of applications for the Sailfish OS powering Jolla phone it was finally time to see what other platforms have to provide. I develop Java applications at work so it was logical to look into iOS and learn some Swift. The Internet is full of resources of how to start developing for iOS and here’s my take to the topic. Now I just need an iPhone to run my app on a real device :)

Getting started

Coming from the Java EE and Web application world it’s good to read some documentation about mobile application development for iPhone and iOS before starting to code. You need to learn the basics concepts about iOS platform and Swift language and good starting point is to check Apple’s resources for developers and iOS developer library and read the guide how to start developing iOS apps (although it’s with Objective-C). To learn Swift you can read guide to Swift language or if you like books there’s also The Swift Programming Language book.

You can also start learning iOS development with several free or paid online courses. Coding with Chris “how to make an iPhone app” series of videos is a good starting point although it’s designed for people who have no programming experience. It provides nice overview to the tools and how to start developing. You can also follow the App Development: Teaching Swift by Apple Education with code examples or if you’ve the money and need diploma see the Udemy course for iOS developers or Udacity’s iOS developer Nanodegree.

It’s also good to read Human Interface Guidelines for iOS-based devices although the guidelines don’t provide any practical examples. It’s a good resource to learn how iOS applications should work, tells you how your app should look and behave and how to use the UI elements that UIKit provides. As I have done apps for Sailfish OS it was good to adapt my thinking to see things in the iOS way.

In practice the best way to learn is to just write code and experiment. Getting to know XCode and Interface Builder takes some time. After using Eclipse and IntelliJ IDEA for Java development both XCode and Apple’s graphical UI editor are somewhat confusing at first.

There’s also couple of iOS development newsletters to follow: iOS Dev Weekly, This Week In Swift. Also the In depth Mac and iOS articles archives is a good resource.

And if you’re using IRC there’s #cocoa-init channel on irc.freenode.net focused on asking and answering questions for beginning developers on iOS and OS X. For more general iOS development you can join #iphonedev channel on irc.freenode.net. To join them you need to register your nick.

Development in practice

Getting started with iOS can be challenging as Swift and Objective-C are used mainly only on Apple’s platform and it has its own names for almost everything. I haven’t yet gathered my own good practices so it’s great that you can read about iOS good practices from Futurice.

Basic tools

For iOS development your options with tools are somewhat limited as you need Mac computer running OS X (10.9.4 or later) for being able to run Apple Xcode and iOS SDK. The other option is to use JetBrains Appcode (99e) which is better (what I’ve understood). Xcode can be installed from Mac App Store and it comes with iOS SDK. Also although you can run your applications in iOS Simulator it helps to have a real device which helps you to understand how apps interact with users and what the look and feel should be. The documentation and examples gets you far but nothing beats to have first hand experience of the platform.

I found it beneficial to watch e.g. the Coding with Chris “how to make an iPhone app” series of videos for getting around XCode development environment.

Xcode and UI builder

Developing for iOS

iPhone applications can be written with Objective-C or with newer Swift programming language. Objective-C is built on top of the C programming language and provides object-oriented capabilities and a dynamic runtime. Swift in the other hand can be described as Objective without the C and is a replacement for the Objective-C language and works side-by-side with it. Wikipedia has good short description of Swift.

Although Swift is relatively new and what I’ve read isn’t quite as robust as Objective-C it’s good starting point for developing iOS apps. Having used some Objective-C for OS X apps I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone if you don’t actually need it.

iOS platform

Apple’s operating system for iPhone, iOS, provides many frameworks for developers and as a developer you’ve to decide which version to target as it affects your application and capabilities. Apple’s iOS developer page provides short overview of what it has to offer. The current version is iOS 8 and i.a. Shinobicontrols has written iOS 8 Day by Day eBook which consists of 39 blog posts covering the most significant features available to developers in iOS 8.

As a developer you have to choose which version of iOS you target and whether your app is universal or only for iPhone or iPad as it affects your code and potential users. Do you need the new features in iOS 8 or is iOS 7 enough and is it worth to make solutions to fit both versions? And do you need different user interface for bigger screen in iPad or is universal version enough? iOS 8 is supported on iPhone 4s or newer and newer iPads and what I read about 72% of devices are using iOS 8 and 25% are on iOS 7. So, I think it’s enough to target iOS 8 as it provides you more options how to implement your app.

Developing with Swift

The best way to get to know Swift is just read some code, watch tutorials and of course write code. To learn Swift you can read guide to Swift language and you can watch from Youtube e.g. rm2kdev series about Swift starting from the basics and example of doing a To Do List app.

One nice element of the Swift system which helps you to get hang of it, is its ability to be cleanly debugged and run within the development environment, using a read–eval–print loop (REPL). It gives you interactive properties more in common with the scripting capabilities of Python than traditional systems programming languages. It’s useful to play with Swift in Xcode Playground and see what your code does.

Knowing Swift language is just one part and the bigger part in my opinion is to know how to use the UI elements that UIKit provides to create good user experience. When I started developing my app with Swift majority of time went to figuring out how to construct the user interface with Xcode UI builder and what the elements should be, not actually writing much code in Swift. User experience section in iOS Developer Library and UI Elements in iOS Human Interface Guidelines provide good starting points for reading about user experience but doesn’t help you much with coding especially when the sample codes are in Objective-C. Basic UI elements like “pull to refresh”, “swipe between views”, “split view” and “slide-out navigation” are more easily found by googling.

We all have our own ways to learn new platform and programming language and I find it beneficial to just create small application which experiment with different concepts and interactions. I’m gathering my own experiments with iOS technologies to GitHub and building a news reader application for High.fi on the way.

So, what are you waiting for? Download Xcode and start developing your own app for iOS :)

Summary

Documentation

iOS 8

Other resources

Courses and guides

Getting Git Right in Helsinki

Software development is fun if you have tools which work great and support what you’re doing. So it was finally great to get hear Sven Peters talking about better software development in teams as Atlassian’s Getting Git Right landed to Helsinki (24.11.2014). Event about Git and of course about Atlassian’s tools.

Getting Git right by svenpet and durdn

Getting Git Right’s main theme was about happy developers, productive teams and how Git and Atlassian’s tools help to achieve that. Sven Peters and Nicola Paolucci presented how to be a happier developer with Git, and how to ship software faster and smarter. It’s good to remember that developing software is after all a social challenge, not a technical one. And Git helps you with it. The presentation slides are available at SlideShare and you can also watch it on Youtube (different event).

Git: You can rewrite history. Timemachine without paradoxes

Nicola Paolucci gave a nice and 5 minute talk about Git and it’s internals. Lot’s of technical details. The main points were “Fast and compact”, “Freedom and safety”, “Explore and understand”, “Control and assemble”. With Git you can rewrite the history safely to e.g. clean commits. Paolucci showed also some tools to help working with Git on the command line like hooks they use and using “better” prompt like liquid-prompt. For GUI you can use Atlassian’s SourceTree.

Git datamodel

Merging

Interesting part of the event was talk about what is efficient and the best Git workflow? The answer is “we don’t know”. It depends as there are different cultures, different products and different teams. There’s no right way but there are some good workflows which might work for you.

One is to use branch per issue, e.g. hot-fix/jira-30-user-avatars, feature/jira-27-user-sign. The simplest workflow is to use feature branches with develop branch. Then the master is very stable. If you have multiple product versions then release branches are good and bug fixes are done to separate branch and merged to other branches.

They also presented how Atlassian’s Stash can help you to work with Git and branches. Like merging changes to branches can be done automatically with hooks or by using Stash. Stash looked nice for controlling and managing your repository with visual interface.

Code reviews: do they feel like this?

Git also helps you to improve code quality with e.g. code reviews. Code reviews shouldn’t be painful as it’s about team ownership, shared knowledge and aim for better code but often there’s developer guilt. It can be made easier by making code reviews part of your daily work by doing it in small patches like pull requests.

Development is also about communication and for that Atlassian presented HipChat. It looked quite nice tool for following what’s happening in a project with aggregating team chat and information from different tools. Following commits and continuous information brings you clear view what’s happening. There are also alternatives to HipChat like Slack or just basic IRC.

But why should you use Git? Benefits like more time to code, better collaboration, dev productivity and it’s the future doesn’t convince everyone. Like pointy haired bosses. So it’s good to remember that Git is also about economics. Delivering software faster, having less bugs and thus having happy customers. Shipping software faster and smarter.

Why Git? from Peters’ slides:

Why Git?

It’s also about economics

In Questions and Answers session there was talk about Atlassian’s strategy with Bitbucket and Stash. They said that both are going strong as they have different use cases. Stash has more enterprise features and you can have the repository on your own premises. Bitbucket is about hosting the repository in Atlassian’s platform and for small and medium team. What I have used Bitbucket it’s nice service but not as user friendly as GitHub. Another interesting question was about storing binary files in Git. There’s no optimal solution yet but just some workarounds like git-annex and git-media which allows managing files with git, without checking the file contents into git. In practice you shouldn’t store binary files in Git and you should separate product to code and assets.

Summary

Atlassians Getting Git Right was nice event and gave good overview about Git and how to use it in software development team. It would have been nice to hear something about the alternatives to Atlassian’s tools (BitBucket, Stash, SourceTree and HipChat) which helps you to do better software development. I can’t deny that Atlassian’s tools work nicely together but sometimes the price is just too high.

Now it’s time to start using Git also on work projects and as all participants got “Just do Git” T-shirt it’s easier :) Thanks to Atlassian and Ambientia for arranging this event.