Monthly notes 16

February in monthly notes looks into what you should think about when using Facebook, suggests you to read “Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984)” by George Orwell and tells you 13 things you should give up if you want to be successful. Also it’s worth checking out Vue.js, use Git standup for daily Scrums and enhance your application accessibility.

Issue 16, 13.2.2017

JavaScript

Introduction to Vue.js
Vue.js is gaining traction more and more each week. If you need an introduction this post by Sarah Dranser is tops. (css-tricks.com) (from https://web-design-weekly.com/)

A Guide to Webpack 2 and Module Bundling
This article is aimed at those who are new to webpack and will cover initial setup and configuration, modules, loaders, plugins, code splitting and hot module replacement. (from Web Design Weekly)

Tools

Git standup
What did I code yesterday? git standup looks crafty tool to remember what you’ve done and works with multiple repos.

Using tmux properly
You may know terminal multiplexers like Screen which was released 1987 but there’s also newer options like tmux (2007). It’s similar to Screen, but has some additional features and is easier to configure. The article tells you how to use tmux properly.

Introducing Docker Secrets Management
The latest Docker release offers a great solution to store your secrets securely in containers. The Docker Secrets Management is a solid approach to do so. (from WDRL #169)

Software development

Five Keys to Boost your Speed and Quality in Software Teams
“Software quality and the speed of the team is a commitment issue”. Focus, communication, conventions, confidence, isolation. Well said.

The Outrageous Cost of Skipping TDD & Code Reviews
Writing tests is one of the crucial parts of software development and the benefits of Test Driven Development has proven itself to be very useful to increase the quality of software. The article shows some numbers why you should do TDD and shares advice about how to implement a more productive quality process.

ARIA Examples
Some practical ARIA examples to enhance your application accessibility. And accessibility isn’t as easy as you thought like Soueidan explains with Accessible tooltips https://sarasoueidan.com/blog/accessible-tooltips/

GitLab’s postmortem of database outage of January 31
On January 31st 2017 GitLab experienced a major service outage for their online service GitLab.com. The outage was caused by an accidental removal of data from our primary database server. They also lost some production data that they were eventually unable to recover. The postmortem of the issue is good to read. GitLab also had live Google Doc while resolving the issue. Hacker News comments also has some good points.

Security

What should you think about when using Facebook?
Facebook collects data about you in hundreds of ways, across numerous channels. It’s very hard to opt out, but reading this article by Vicki Boykis on what they collect, you’ll learn to better understand the risks of the platform so you can choose to be more restrictive with your Facebook usage. (from WDRL #169)

Something different

13 Things You Should Give Up If You Want To Be Successful
Intuitively obvious things but harder to follow.

Sketchcase
Whiteboard Sticker simply turns any laptop lid into a portable whiteboard.

George Orwell: 1984, pdf and audio
If you haven’t read “Nineteen Eighty-Four (1984)” by George Orwell yet, here’s your chance: The entire book is available for free as PDF and Audio versions. I personally recommend it to everyone who is only slightly interested in just one of these topics: social change, politics, technology. (from WDRL #169)

Monthly notes 15

This time in monthly notes we cover design trends for interfaces, Apple steps up to iOS user interface templates game, learn Flexbox and Redux, something about microservices with Docker and see what GitHub has learned about CSP.

Issue 15, 28.1.2017

User Interfaces

Review of Popular Design Trends for Interfaces in 2016
What should apps look like in 2017? Let’s start with looking at what happened in 2016 with Marina Yalanska. (from iOS Dev Weekly Issue 284)

Apple iOS UI templates
Apple joined the party of iOS UI templates with their own comprehensive set. Would be nice if they would expand this to tvOS, watchOS and macOS. (from iOS Dev Weekly Issue 284)

Crash Course: UI Design
A pretty epic article by Jeff Wang that revisits the design process he took on a recent project from the UI angle. (from Web Design Weekly)

Microservices

Containers and microservices and Node.js! Oh, my!
Learn microservices, Node.js, and containers by example using the provided application. This post walks through an example application that is split out into Node.js microservices running in Docker containers. (from Microservice Weekly 64)

Building Efficient Dockerfiles – Node.js
Old but good to know. Many Dockerfiles are written inefficiently, especially if you’re using npm. You should use caching to improve the performance of your Docker container. tl;dr; add package.json to tmp before running npm install in there. (from WDRL 166)

Making microservices more resilient with circuit breaking
‘Circuit breaking’ is the idea of shutting off traffic to an instance if requests to it fail too frequently. Good article of how linkerd can help you with it. (from Web Operations Weekly 99)

On the front end

Understanding Flexbox: Everything you need to know
A very thorough attempt to cover all the fundamental concepts you need to get comfortable with the CSS Flexbox model. (from Front-end focus 273)

React or Vue: Which Javascript UI Library Should You Be Using?
If you’re not sure which to pick, start here. (from Weekend Reading)

Thinking in Redux (when all you’ve known is MVC)
Good explanation of Redux with React although the article uses it with React Native. Redux is quite simple in concept but you’ve to think differently how things work. Another option to Redux would be to use Mobx.

Accessibility testing with Intern
Covering unit tests and functional tests, The Intern is a nice testing tool for JavaScript. But you can also use it for accessibility testing. (from WDRL 163)

Security

GitHub’s post-CSP journey
Previously Github shared their learnings from using the Content Security Policy at github.com. Now they share more learnings in and the focus lies on i.a. img-src, form nonces, same-site cookies. (from WDRL 166)

Something different

Finnish mountain biking expertise was awarded a couple of Design and Innovation Awards this year: Pole Evolink 140 and Huck Norris. The super long and slack Pole Evolink 140 bike throws up questions about geometry standards. And although not a new innovation with protecting your rims and tyres, the Huck Norris anti-pinch-flat insert is a plastic foam ring effectively protects your rims from dents and reduces the risk of burping. You can ride tubeless with an even lower tire pressure or even a lighter carcass, plus glean more grip.

Monthly notes 14

Before opening the Christmas presents it’s time to check what’s in the monthly notes in December. This year there’s not much extra holidays so use them wisely :) Merry Christmas!

Issue 14, 23.12.2016

JavaScript

Angular 2 is terrible
I haven’t used Angular 2 enough to have strong opinions about it but looks like the Internet has. “Shaky Foundation, Not Invented Here, Premature Abstraction, HTML Minus, Unnecessary Verbosity, Poor Performance and Bloat, Putting the Java back in JavaScript, Terrible Documentation.” “Please for goodness sake don’t use Angular. For less than one-tenth of its size, Vue.js delivers a much better development experience.” (from Reddit)

TypeScript: the missing introduction
Introduction to how we can think about TypeScript, and its role in “supercharging” our JavaScript development. (from Hacking UI #155)

Getting Started with Webpack 2 and Migrating to Webpack 2
Keeping your tools up to date is part of development. (from JavaScript Weekly Issue 315)

5 Tips To Improve Your JS with ES6 – Crater Conf Talk
Virtual conference about ES6 features such as Arrow Functions, Object Literal Shorthand, Spread, Destructuring Assignment and Modules which helps you improve your JavaScript and browser code. You’ll see what it takes to run ES6 code today, and the tools you need to support the features you want in browsers that aren’t yet up to date. Slides

Java

Feeding Spring Boot metrics to Elasticsearch
“After low level system data, the next family of metrics you want to start tracking and monitoring are JVM level metrics. Here’s a good way to go it with the ELK stack.” (from Java Web Weekly, Issue 154)

Making Spring Boot application run serverless with AWS
“Very interesting writeup showing how to transition a Boot application to run servlerless on AWS. I definitely need to give that a try to get a better understanding of what it can do.” (from Java Web Weekly, Issue 154)

Building Microservices application on AWS
Good article summarizing the common characteristics of Microservices, the main challenges of building Microservices, and how to leverage AWS to overcome those challenges.

Infrastructure as code: running microservices on AWS using Docker, Terraform, and ECS
Slides of a talk about managing your software and infrastructure-as-code that walks through a real-world example of deploying microservices on AWS using Docker, Terraform, and ECS. (from Microservices Weekly #61)

Security

SQL Injection Cheat Sheet
A detailed resource to find technical information about the many different variants of SQL injection vulnerabilities. A good reference for both seasoned penetration testers and those just getting started in web app security. (from DB Weekly 135)

Tools of the trade

Fabulous macOS Tips & Tricks
Some useful productivity tricks with macOS. Like move a file by pressing Cmd+C and then Cmd+Option+V in the destination directory. (from Weekend Reading)

Something different

99 good news stories that we probably didn’t hear about in 2016
“Don’t let you be fooled by the all negative news and instead embrace the good things that happened as well. Despite some bad news, 2016 was quite a good year. Enjoy its last days.” (from WDRL)

Low-background steel
Did you know that after the first atomic bombs in the 1940s and 1950s the background radiation levels increased across the world and thus modern steel is contaminated with radionuclides because its production used atmospheric air. Low background steel is so called because it does not suffer from such nuclear contamination. This steel is used in devices that require the highest sensitivity for detecting radionuclides.

Weekly notes 12

Late Autumn and rain has arrived to Finland and now we have good reason to stay at home and read about new ideas and what happens in technology.

Weekly notes, issue 12, 30.10.2016

Learning new things

Cyber Security Base with F‑Secure
Free and open course to learn about tools used to analyse flaws in software systems, necessary knowledge to build secure software systems, the skills needed to perform risk and threat analysis on existing systems and the relevant legislation within EU. It’s a course series by University of Helsinki in collaboration with F‑Secure Cyber Security Academy that focuses on building core knowledge and abilities related to the work of a cyber security professional.

Google Style Guides
Thinking about how to format your code? Luckily Google Style Guides has solved it for you. And with explanations like for Java.

Free programming books by O’Reilly
O’Reilly is known for their programming books and they’ve compiled the latest insights of what’s happening in the world of software engineering, architecture, and open source. Lot’s of topics regarding microservices from different aspects.

Open Guides: Amazon Web Services
“AWS’s own documentation is a great but sprawling resource few have time to read fully, and it doesn’t include anything but official facts, so omits experiences of engineers.” Open Guides: AWS is by and for engineers who use AWS. It aims to be a useful, living reference that consolidates links, tips, gotchas, and best practices. It arose from discussion and editing over beers by several engineers who have used AWS extensively.

The world of JavaScript

Progressive Web Apps with React.js: Part I  –  Introduction
Progressive Web Apps (PWA) take advantage of new technologies to bring the best of mobile sites & native apps to users. In the series of posts Addy Osmani shares his experience turning React-based web apps into PWAs.

Yarn – new JavaScript package manager
Yarn – fast, reliable, and secure JavaScript package manager. Alternative to npm client. Looks promising.

NPM vs. Yarn cheat sheet
Good survival guide to Yarn JavaScript package manager. Yarn has some goodies which npm doesn’t, like licenses generation.

Something different

11-hour struggle to make tea using Wi-Fi kettle
Making a cup of tea should be simple enough but if you’re using a Wi-Fi kettle it doesn’t always go according to plan.

Total Nightmare: USB-C and Thunderbolt 3
“Simple-looking port hides a world of complexity, and the (thankful) backward-compatibility uses different kinds of cables for different tasks. Shoppers have to be very careful to buy exactly the right cable for their devices!”

Weekly notes 11

This time weekly notes provides pointers to last weeks JavaOne, teaches you to design better forms, tells about 171 words every programmer should understand and how to learn something about psychology which might help to understand yourself and maybe also users. And last but not least the documentary of last year’s Transcontinental 2015 tells a story of awesome cyclist who ride across Europe to Istanbul.

Weekly notes, issue 11, 27.9.2016

Development

JavaOne 2016: 85 recorded sessions
JavaOne was held las week and if you couldn’t attend it, like me, then you should have a look at the JavaOne 2016 Youtube playlist with 85 recorded sessions.

You need to be this tall to use [micro] services
Good hacker news comment on Microservices. “Thing is – these are all generally good engineering practices. But with monoliths, you can get away without having to do them. But with microservices, your average engineering standards have to be really high. Its not enough if you have good developers. You need great engineers.” (from @jaykreps)

Real world #kanban board

Good to know

The MIT License, Line by Line
171 words every programmer should understand. The MIT License is the most popular open-source software license. Here’s one read of it, line by line. Hacker News comments has also some wisdom. (from Hacker Newsletter #319)

re:publica 2015 – Mikko Hypponen: Is our online future worth sacrificing our privacy and security?
Video from year ago but still relevant as Mikko Hypponen explains why Facebook wants to get your phone number from Whatsapp. Watch from 12 minutes onward.

Emoji from iOS beta 4
What does that emoji mean? Here’s a list of emoji as JSON, extracted from iOS 10 beta 4.

Keeping up with development

The 10 Best iOS Development Blogs
A list of the the ten best iOS development blogs in no particular order. If you’ve ventured to iOS development then most of these are propably familiar, like raywenderlich.com with great tutorials.

How to keep your NPM dependencies up-to-date
“Tools for helping you keep your npm dependencies up-to-date. See the comments for more tools.” Uptr worked nicely for my use case. (from @jpaakko)

User experience is essential

Developer Experience Matters
“Developer Experience is one of the biggest key factors for developers to decide if they use certain technologies to use. Developer Experience (DX) is a type of User Experience (UX)!” (from @girlie_mac)

Curated list of online Psychology courses
It’s good to understand what drives and affects us and one way to do that is to learn something about Psychology. This curated list of online courses covers topics like Introduction to Psychology, Introduction To Social Psychology, The Psychology Of Persuasion, Psychology of Popularity, Positive Psychology, Logical and Critical Thinking, The Science of Stress Management and Introduction to Consumer Behavior. (from Userfocus Newsletter September 2016)

SXSW Keynote – You Know What? Fuck Dropdowns
35 reasons not to use a dropdown menu. (from Userfocus Newsletter September 2016)

Design Better Forms
Common mistakes designers make with forms and how to fix them. (from Userfocus Newsletter September 2016)

Something different

Transcontinental 2015: Race to Istanbul
The Transcontinental is a race like no other. On the 24th of July 2015, 172 riders arrived in Garaardsbergen, Belgium and raced to Istanbul, Turkey. Much like the early days of bicycle racing cyclist ride with no team cars or soigneurs to look after them. It is each for their own taking on Europe’s toughest terrain. The documentary follows the highs and lows of the race from the view of the Race Directors.

Weekly notes 10

Summer has been relative nice this far even here in Finland and my short holiday is just couple of days away. But before that it’s time to check this years Java tools and technologies landscape report, get some useful plugins for Atom, start developing a React application with no configuration and read about the benefits of Serverless architecture. And while traveling it’s good to listen to podcasts for developers.

Weekly notes, issue 25.7.2016

JavaScript

Create Apps with No Configuration
Developing a React app has lots of things to setup so using Create React App, officially supported way to create single-page React application, as a boilerplate generator is good choice. And with single command, and all the build dependencies, configs, and scripts are moved right into your project so you’re not lock-in.

A Better File Structure For React/Redux Applications
Something to think about how you organize your React code. Similar to how you could organize things with Java application.

Tools of the trade

Java Tools and Technologies Landscape Report 2016
ZeroTurnaround has just released its Java Tools and Technologies Landscape Report 2016, which analyzes the data about the tools and technologies Java developers use. Good to note that the survey received just over 2000 responses.

Atom treasures: a list of Atom plugins I can’t live without
AtomEditor is great for developers and better when extended with plugins. Found some new ones, like sync-settings. (from The Practical Dev)

New DevTools Web Performance Tooling Tips and Features (video)
Chrome’s DevTools is powerful but not always so easy to utilize. Paul Irish and Sam Saccone show off new tips, tricks and features in DevTools to help you debug the performance of your site.
(from HTML5 Weekly Issue 241)

Bash boilerplates
When hacking up Bash scripts, there are often things such as logging or command-line argument parsing that: You need every time, Come with a number of pitfalls you want to avoid, Keep you from your actual work. Here’s an attempt to bundle those things in a generalized way so that they are reusable as-is in most scripts.

Learning new things

79 Podcasts for Developers, Programmers & Software Engineers
Podcasts are incredibly useful for staying on top of all the latest happenings in software development.

Architecture

Benefits and drawbacks of Serverless architecture
Serverless architectures refer to applications that significantly depend on third-party services. But what are the benefits and drawbacks to such a way of designing and deploying applications. (from Java Web Weekly 133)

Something different

Cheating at Pokemon Go with a Hackrf and GPS spoofing
Pokemon Go has taken the world with enthusiasm and it requires you to walk around and explore the city for Pokestops, Gyms and hatching eggs. But why do that if you can cheat? Since the game is GPS based with little tinkering you can spoof your GPS location using a HackRF software defined radio and simulate walking around.

Weekly notes 9

Summer is here and mountain biking trails are calling but keeping up with what happens in the field never stops. This week Apple had their worldwide developers conference which filled up social media although didn’t present anything remarkable. In the other news there was good collection of slides for Java developers, ebook for DevOps and HyperDev looks interesting for quickly bang out JavaScript.

Weekly notes, issue 9, 17.6.2016

Java: stay updated, reactive and in the cloud

13 Decks Java developers must see to stay updated
Selection of nice slideshows for Java developers. Best practices, microservices, debugging, Elasticsearch, SQL.

Java SE 8 best practices
Java 8 best practices by Stephen Colebourne’s is good read. The slides cover all the basic uses, such as lambdas, exceptions, streams and interfaces. (from the “13 Decks Java developers” post)

Microservices + Oracle: A Bright Future
Good slides of what are microservices. Considerations, prerequisites, patterns, technologies and Oracle’s plans. (from the “13 Decks Java developers” post)

Notes on Reactive Programming, Part I: The Reactive Landscape and Part II: Writing Some Code
A solid intro to the reactive programming. And no, it’s no coincidence that this is first. A reactive system is an entirely different beast, and such a good fit for a small set of scenarios. (from Java Web Weekly, Issue 128)

Netflix OSS, Spring Cloud, or Kubernetes? How About All of Them!
The Netflix ecosystem of tools is based on practical usage at scale, so it’s always super useful to go deep into understanding their tools. (from Java Web Weekly, Issue 128)

Takeouts from WWDC 2016


Digging into the dev documentation for APFS, Apple’s new file system

Interesting low level stuff in Mac OS Sierra. APFS takes over HFS+, has native encryption, snapshots (Time Machine done right) and is case-sensitive. Hacker News comments are worth reading.

The 13 biggest announcements from Apple WWDC 2016
WWDC 2016 was about software and incremental changes. Siri is opening up to app developers, iOS is growing up, iOS gets Apple TV remote app and Apple introduces single sign-on system.

Continuous learning

DevOpsSec: Securing Software through Continuous Delivery
DevOpsSec free ebook is worth reading if you’re interested securing software through continuous delivery. Uses case studies from Etsy, Netflix, and the London Multi-Asset Exchange to illustrate the steps leading organizations have taken to secure their DevOps processes.

Microservice Pitfalls & AntiPatterns, Part 1
An anti-pattern is just like a pattern, except that instead of a solution it gives something that looks superficially like a solution but isn’t one. A pitfall is something that was never a good idea, even from the start. (from The Microservice Weekly #31)

Tools of the trade

Introducing HyperDev
HyperDev looks to be an interesting new product at Fog Creek Software (known from e.g. Trello). It’s developer playground for building full-stack web-apps fast. “The fastest way to bang out JavaScript code on Node.js and get it running on the internet.” as Joel Spolsky describes it.

V8, modern JavaScript, and beyond – Google I/O 2016
Debugging Node.js apps with Chrome Developer Tools is soon enabled by coming v8_inspector support.

Something different

Why do we have allergies?
Allergies such as peanut allergy and hay fever make millions of us miserable, but scientists aren’t even sure why they exist.

Weekly notes 8

The Spring has been quite busy at work but Summer is just around the corner and that means either holidays or having some time to learn new things and see how things could be make better. My weekly notes has turned out to be monthly notes but that’s how things sometimes work out. But back to the issue which covers topics about continuous learning, best practices in development, looks into building blocks in Netflix’s stack and how to get started with ELK stack. And for the Summer project there’s Stanford’s Swift and iOS 9 course. Having done my iOS app with Swift it seems to be nice language.

Weekly notes, issue 8, 19.5.2016

Learning new things

Developing iOS 9 Apps With Swift from Stanford
Stanford iOS course is updated for Swift and iOS 9 and is good resource for learning iOS, Swift, or just to refresh yourself on best practices when developing for the platform. (Indie iOS focus weekly, issue 66)

Keep on learning and keep it simple

The single biggest mistake programmers make every day
Nice writeup of basic principles in programming. In short: Keep It Stupid Simple. Make it work, make it right, make it fast. Do One Thing.

Being A Developer After 40
Software development is always changing which this article tells nicely and gives good advice for the young at heart how to reach the glorious age of 40 as a happy software developer. tl;dr; Forget the hype, Choose your galaxy wisely, Learn about software history, Keep on learning, Teach, Workplaces suck, Know your worth, Send the elevator down, LLVM, Follow your gut, APIs are king, Fight complexity,

5 Tips To Improve Your JS with ES6
A well recorded hour long remote talk covering not only some handy ES6 tips, but how to work with ES6 generally and some of the tools available. (from JavaScript Weekly, issue 274)

Microservices, best practices and Java

Microservices are about applying a group of Best Practices
Moving an existing codebase to a microservice architecture is no small feat. And that’s not even taking into account the non-technical challenges. We definitely need more nuanced strategies based on actual production experience with microservices to help drive these architectural decisions. (from Java Web Weekly 123)

jDays 2016: Java EE Microservices Platforms
A lot of people preach that you can’t build microservices with Java EE but Steve Millidge’s talk about Java EE Microservices Platforms tells us that Payara Micro and Wildfly Swarm are fast and have a small memory footprint and that it does not require any code changes to port the application from one to other. (from Java Web Weekly 18/16)

The Netflix Stack: Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
Microservices architecture in software development is what you should nowadays do but the question is how? The Netflix Stack article series covers some open source libraries you can use to build your architecture. Part 1 covers Eureka for service discovery and Part 2 is about Hystrix, latency and fault tolerance library. Part 3 is about creating rest clients for all of your services. The blog posts are an overview of what you can find in the accompanying repository.

Java app monitoring with ELK: part 1: Logstash and Logback and part 2: ElasticSearch
These blog posts tells you about the ELK stack (ElastichSearch, Logtash, Kibana) which is useful tool for logging visualization and analysis. (from Java Web Weekly 116)

SQL

10 SQL tricks that you didn’t think were possible
Lukas Eder tells you 10 SQL tricks that many of you might not have thought were possible. The article is a summary of his extremely fast-paced, ridiculously childish-humoured talk. “SQL is the original microservice”.

Tools of the trade

mrzool/bash-sensible
“A a simple starting point for a better Bash user experience out of the box.” These settings do make Bash easier and more useful. (from Weekend Reading)

Stranger Danger: Addressing the Security Risk in NPM Dependencies
Presentation from the O’Reilly Fluent Conference by Snyk co-founders which covers recently found exploit, and shows you how to use Snyk in your development workflow.

Something different

Dlexsiya
Interesting simulation with JavaScript how the web looks like to people with dyslexia. In the comments person with dyslexia tells that it’s easier to read when the text shifts. So, would dyslexia mode be good for website UX :) (from Weekend Reading)

Weekly notes 7

Easter and couple of days of free time is good for taking a break from the routines or finally have some time to develop your personal pet projects. At least my Highkara news reader for iOS needs some UI tests for screenshots and maybe I get to finish my imgur app for tvOS. But before that here’s the weekly notes.

This week we get overview to OWASP projects, see how Stack Overflow is built, learn to design for the Apple TV and get to run WebLogic on Docker container. Finally we discover how Spotify Discover Weekly playlists work.

Issue 7, 2016-03-24

Security

Quick developer’s guide to OWASP projects
Interesting poster-type developer’s guide to OWASP projects. Learn how to secure your web apps against common web vulnerabilities.

How it’s built

Stack Overflow: The Architecture – 2016 Edition
If you’re wondering how’s Stack Overflow built and what’s the load check this article. Interesting. Running on Windows using IIS, ASP.Net, .Net, SQL Server and supported by CentOS and Redis, Elasticsearch.

Why I Left Gulp and Grunt for npm Scripts
Cory House explains how Gulp and Grunt are unnecessary abstractions, whereas npm scripts are plenty powerful and often easier to live with. It’s easier to debug as there’s no extra layer of abstraction, there’s no dependence on plugin authors to update, original tool is better and clearer documented. (from Web Design Weekly #219)

iOS and tvOS development

An in-app debugging and exploration tool for iOS
Excellent tool for iOS developer which helps you for example to simulate 3D Touch in the Simulator. Also in Xcode 7.3 you can now simulate 3D Touch without external tools if your trackpad has Force Touch.

Designing for the Apple TV
Michael Flarup writes some tips for getting design right when working with the Apple TV. He covers all of the basics but also some interesting points like making sure you meet the expectations of a TV based platform in terms of displaying and taking advantage of video based content. (from iOS dev Weekly #239)

tvOS.design
This is pttrns for tvOS. Not a huge amount of data in yet but what’s there is worth a look. (from iOS dev Weekly #240)

Enterprise Java

WebLogic on Docker Containers Series: Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
If you are using WebLogic as your application server, you should have a look at Bruno Borges series about running WebLogic on Docker. First post gets you started and shows how to create a basic Docker image with WebLogic and one with a configured WebLogic domain. The second post takes a more detailed look at the creation of the images, and the third one focusses on the domain configuration. (from Java Weekly 8/16)

Something different

I Documented Two Years of Travel By Painting In My Moleskine Notebook
Lovely hand-crafted art collection created by a traveler during her visits to different places around the world. An alternative to taking thousands of photos that no one will look at afterwards anyway and a beautiful, more emotional representation of lovely places. (from WDRL 126)

How Spotify Discover Weekly playlists work? and Recommending music on Spotify with deep learning
If you’re wondering how Spotify finds the tracks to your Discover Weekly list, read these two articles.

Weekly notes 6

This year has started slowly and weekly notes has frozen to monthly notes. This time they tell us i.a. how to put Spring Boot in Docker, useful features of Java EE 7, ponder what all there’s to do to launch your mobile app, read tips how to get better with Node.js and how smaller is better. And finally we have Yoga routine to keep our body in shape.

Issue 6, 2016-01-27

Java is strong with this one

Java EE 7 At A Glance and Top 10 Java EE 7 Backend Features
A rundown of some of the most useful Java EE features – most of which look quite handy.

New year’s Spring Boot tricks in a container
Read how you can combine Spring Boot’s hot restarting and running application in a Docker container. Of course you could just run Spring Boot from the IDE and expose the MongoDB container port for the application.

Nashorn: Run JavaScript on the JVM
Nashorn is a high-performance JavaScript runtime written in Java for the JVM. It allows developers to embed JavaScript code inside their Java applications and even use Java classes and methods from their JavaScript code. But why would you want to do that?

Mobile app development is fun?

Everything you need to launch your app
Good checklist to go through during app development and when you’re going to launch your app. Launching an app isn’t as straightforward as you would think. (from Indie iOS Focus Weekly 48)

Everything you need to know about app screenshots
And with everything it really means that. Making screenshots of your app isn’t as easy as you would think. (from Indie iOS Focus Weekly 46)

Creating perfect App Store Screenshots of your iOS App
More about app screenshots. This time doing it “the right way” for all device types and languages. Isn’t easy this time either but it’s automated. You just need to use snapshot, frameit and to use UI Tests.

Why you shouldn’t bother creating a mobile app
Post-mortem of Birdly, a receipt management app in the business to business market. Gives insight and lessons to learn about the App Store. Even though the app had good use case the users didn’t really need it. (from Indie iOS Focus Weekly 48)

Tools

Find & fix known vulnerabilities in Node.js dependencies
Snyk looks to be quite crafty tool to find & fix known vulnerabilities in Node.js dependencies. Integrate Snyk into your CI and monitoring your applications for newly disclosed vulnerabilities.

TL;DR; Simplified man pages
Simplified man pages for when you just need to get shit done. Finally! You can use different clients for it and install if from e.g. npm install -g tldr.

pre-commit hooks
Some out-of-the-box hooks for pre-commit. See also: pre-commit.

Getting better is good?

Reduce Your bundle.js File Size By Doing This One Thing
Simple! Use relative file paths. The article looks at two examples to show the difference.

The Website Obesity Crisis
Keynote from Web Directions 2015: The Website Obesity Crisis. Beautiful websites come in all sizes and page weights but mostly-text sites are growing bigger with every passing year when there’s no reason for that. There’s also video.

How to Become a Better Node.js Developer in 2016
Tips and best practices not just for development but how to operate Node.js infrastructures, how you should do your day-to-day development and other useful pieces of advice. (from Twitter)
TL;DR; Use ES2015, follow callback conventions and async patterns, take care with error handling, use JavaScript standard style, follow the Twelve-Factor application rules, monitor your applications, use build system, update dependencies weekly and keep up.

Something different

15-minute yoga routine to enhance balance and agility
See how yoga can help you to enhance your balance and agility, including a 15-minute video that demonstrates these principles. This is targeted more for mountainbike riders than developers but better agility and balance doesn’t hurt anyone :)

The 100 best photographs ever taken without photoshop
Nature and humankind are both great artists, and when they join forces, amazing masterpieces can be produced.