Notes from React Helsinki August 2018 meetup

React Helsinki August 2018 meetup was hosted by Smartly.io at their office in Postitalo next to the Central Railway Station. Here’s my short notes from the event. To follow the community, React Helsinki has also a Facebook group.

The meetup started with Splitting React codebases for increased development speed by Hugo Kiiski from Smartly.io. He told how their Video Editor component is separated from main frontend. Code is in monorepo managed by Lerna. More tools going to be splitted. The recording of the presentation can be seen on Vimeo. (Twitter)

Splitting React codebases for increased development speed

Second topic was live coding and Making your own Ignite generator – for React Native by Toni Ristola from Gofore. It’s useful e.g. if you do many projects in a year. The recording of the presentation can be seen on Vimeo. (Twitter)

When to use generator
When to use generator

Why build your own
Why build your own

Use GraphQL! by Mikhail Novikov showed a quick intro to GraphQL, covered the current state of its adoption and described several ways of how to move to GraphQL. GraphQL “fills the gap between client and server developer needs and values. Matching server capabilities with client requirements.” GraphQL clients to use are i.a. Apollo and Relay. See the slides for more information. The recording of the presentation can be seen on Vimeo. (Twitter)

GraphQL parts
GraphQL parts

GraphQL adoption
GraphQL adoption

As I mentioned the event has hosted by Smartly.io and their office in Postitalo was cosy and had nice demo room for the meetup. Also the food and beverages were nice althought the hamburger patty was a bit too raw.

Some food & drinks
Some food & drinks

Smartly.io entrance with swings
Smartly.io entrance with swings

Monthly notes 33

Summer has turned to Autumn and it begins to show in the weather. Sun is setting earlier and soon it’s dark almost from dawn to dusk, rain clouds are gathering in the sky with cold winds. Good time to stay inside and read some articles and learn new things. Here’s the monthly notes for August.

Issue 33, 28.8.2018

Learning

Elements of Artificial Intelligence free online course
“Do you wonder what AI really means? Are you thinking about the kind of impact AI might have on your job or life? Do you want to understand how AI will develop and affect us in the coming years? Then this is the course for you!”

Microservices and cloud

Docker Pattern: The Build Container
Let’s say that you’re developing a microservice in a compiled language or an interpreted language that requires some additional “build” steps to package and lint your application code. This is a useful docker pattern for the “build” container.

Experiences with running PostgreSQL on Kubernetes
Gravitational CTO, Sasha Klizhentas, tells about his experience running PostgreSQL on Kubernetes. The challenges involved, open source and commercial tools that can help and other alternatives to managing stateful applications on Kubernetes.

Google Cloud Platform – The Good, Bad, and Ugly (It’s Mostly Good)
Deps developer tells his thoughts about Google Cloud Platform and splits them into good, meh, bad, ugly, and opportunities for improvement. He compares and contrasts with Amazon Web Services (AWS), the other hosting provider that he has the most experience with, and GCP’s biggest competitor.

Goodbye Microservices: From 100s of problem children to 1 superstar
Segment’s story of going to microservices architecture and back. “When deciding between microservices or a monolith, there are different factors to consider with each. In some parts of our infrastructure, microservices work well but our server-side destinations were a perfect example of how this popular trend can actually hurt productivity and performance. It turns out, the solution for us was a monolith.”

Development

Introducing Teleport: Over-the-air hot reloading & debugging for PWA’s
“Wouldn’t it be great if you could instantly hot reload & debug PWA’s on any platform, by just opening a link?”

Have you ever needed to generate a random number in code?
Have you ever needed to generate a random number in code? whether it’s for rolling a dice, or shuffling a set, this tweet thread is here for you! There’s no reason that it should be easy or obvious, very experienced programmers repeat common mistakes. I did, before I learned … from (@colmmacc)

Tools of the trade

Semantic Commit Messages
See how a minor change to your commit message style can make you a better programmer. Format: <type>(<scope>): <subject>. <scope> is optional.

Something different

The Psychology of Money
“Let me tell you the story of two investors, neither of whom knew each other, but whose paths crossed in an interesting way.”

Creative burnout is inevitable. Here are 10 ways to beat it
“Ten pros share their tricks for staying engaged with your work.”