Weekly notes 8

The Spring has been quite busy at work but Summer is just around the corner and that means either holidays or having some time to learn new things and see how things could be make better. My weekly notes has turned out to be monthly notes but that’s how things sometimes work out. But back to the issue which covers topics about continuous learning, best practices in development, looks into building blocks in Netflix’s stack and how to get started with ELK stack. And for the Summer project there’s Stanford’s Swift and iOS 9 course. Having done my iOS app with Swift it seems to be nice language.

Weekly notes, issue 8, 19.5.2016

Learning new things

Developing iOS 9 Apps With Swift from Stanford
Stanford iOS course is updated for Swift and iOS 9 and is good resource for learning iOS, Swift, or just to refresh yourself on best practices when developing for the platform. (Indie iOS focus weekly, issue 66)

Keep on learning and keep it simple

The single biggest mistake programmers make every day
Nice writeup of basic principles in programming. In short: Keep It Stupid Simple. Make it work, make it right, make it fast. Do One Thing.

Being A Developer After 40
Software development is always changing which this article tells nicely and gives good advice for the young at heart how to reach the glorious age of 40 as a happy software developer. tl;dr; Forget the hype, Choose your galaxy wisely, Learn about software history, Keep on learning, Teach, Workplaces suck, Know your worth, Send the elevator down, LLVM, Follow your gut, APIs are king, Fight complexity,

5 Tips To Improve Your JS with ES6
A well recorded hour long remote talk covering not only some handy ES6 tips, but how to work with ES6 generally and some of the tools available. (from JavaScript Weekly, issue 274)

Microservices, best practices and Java

Microservices are about applying a group of Best Practices
Moving an existing codebase to a microservice architecture is no small feat. And that’s not even taking into account the non-technical challenges. We definitely need more nuanced strategies based on actual production experience with microservices to help drive these architectural decisions. (from Java Web Weekly 123)

jDays 2016: Java EE Microservices Platforms
A lot of people preach that you can’t build microservices with Java EE but Steve Millidge’s talk about Java EE Microservices Platforms tells us that Payara Micro and Wildfly Swarm are fast and have a small memory footprint and that it does not require any code changes to port the application from one to other. (from Java Web Weekly 18/16)

The Netflix Stack: Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3
Microservices architecture in software development is what you should nowadays do but the question is how? The Netflix Stack article series covers some open source libraries you can use to build your architecture. Part 1 covers Eureka for service discovery and Part 2 is about Hystrix, latency and fault tolerance library. Part 3 is about creating rest clients for all of your services. The blog posts are an overview of what you can find in the accompanying repository.

Java app monitoring with ELK: part 1: Logstash and Logback and part 2: ElasticSearch
These blog posts tells you about the ELK stack (ElastichSearch, Logtash, Kibana) which is useful tool for logging visualization and analysis. (from Java Web Weekly 116)


10 SQL tricks that you didn’t think were possible
Lukas Eder tells you 10 SQL tricks that many of you might not have thought were possible. The article is a summary of his extremely fast-paced, ridiculously childish-humoured talk. “SQL is the original microservice”.

Tools of the trade

“A a simple starting point for a better Bash user experience out of the box.” These settings do make Bash easier and more useful. (from Weekend Reading)

Stranger Danger: Addressing the Security Risk in NPM Dependencies
Presentation from the O’Reilly Fluent Conference by Snyk co-founders which covers recently found exploit, and shows you how to use Snyk in your development workflow.

Something different

Interesting simulation with JavaScript how the web looks like to people with dyslexia. In the comments person with dyslexia tells that it’s easier to read when the text shifts. So, would dyslexia mode be good for website UX :) (from Weekend Reading)

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