Monthly notes 35

December is just around the corner but before that here’s monthly notes for November. More about leadership and stories, something about software development.

Issue 35, 13.11.2018

Frontend

CSS and Network Performance
What are best network performance practices when it comes to loading CSS? How can we get to Start Render most quickly? Good article of how your page will only render as quickly as your slowest stylesheet. And what to do about it. tl;dr; “Lazyload any CSS not needed for Start Render”, “Avoid @import”, “Be wary of synchronous CSS and JavaScript order”, “Load CSS as the DOM needs it”. (from @csswizardy)

A React job interview — recruiter perspective
Good questions if you’re doing React interviews or being the interviewee, “A React job interview — recruiter perspective”. (from @walokra)

Tools of the trade

jp – Command line interface to JMESPath
I’ve been using jq for manipulating JSON on commandline but there’s better, more logical, alternative. jp is a cli interface to JMESPath expression language for manipulating JSON. And there’s tutorial. (from @walokra)

Bash-it
Bash-it is a collection of community Bash commands and scripts for Bash 3.2+. (And a shameless ripoff of oh-my-zsh😃). Includes autocompletion, themes, aliases, custom functions, a few stolen pieces from Steve Losh, and more.

Detecting Memory Leaks From a JVM Heap Dump (with JXRay)
Good article of learning about detecting memory leaks from a JVM heap dump and Garbage Collection. Unfortunately the tool used for analyzing heap dump is commercial and not open-source tools like Eclipse MAT or VisualVM. (from @java)

Security

Can’t approve payroll? Blackhat sysadmin when my paycheck is on the line!
Interesting story from the trenches of how and what happened when infosec guy found vulnerabilities on Basware Banking software (from 2015. tl;dr; Multiple unresolved vulnerabilities in Basware Banking/Maksuliikenne. Unbelievable story especially how it was handled by vendor and related parties
(from @walokra)

Leadership

Managing with the Brain in Mind
“Treat people fairly, draw people together to solve problems, promote entrepreneurship and autonomy, foster certainty wherever possible, and find ways to raise the perceived status of everyone”. Good read about SCARF. (from @walokra)

On Being A Senior Engineer
What makes for a good senior engineer? tl;dr; Be mature engineer. Good read for everyone regardless of the line of business.

  • Seek out constructive criticism of their designs.
  • Understand the non-technical areas of how they are perceived.
  • Do not shy away from making estimates, and are always trying to get better at it.
  • Have an innate sense of anticipation, even if they don’t know they do.
  • Understand that not all of their projects are filled with rockstar-on-stage work.
  • Lift the skills and expertise of those around them.
  • Make their trade-offs explicit when making judgements and decisions.
  • Don’t practice CYAE (“Cover Your Ass Engineering”)
  • Be empathetic.
  • Don’t make empty complaints.
  • Be aware of cognitive biases

The Ten Commandments of Egoless Programming
The Ten Commandments of Egoless Programming, as originally established in Jerry Weinberg’s book The Psychology of Computer Programming.

Something different

You work to live, not live to work
Remember, your job is not your life. You work to live, not live to work. Work on what makes you happy and not burn yourself out. Thread has good tips to recognize it and take control. (from @jevakallio)

Former CIA Chief Explains How Spies Use Disguises
Cool run down on the use of disguises by a former CIA Chief of Disguise.(from @TinkerSec)

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