Create secure code with Secure Code Bootcamp

Software development contains many aspects which the developer has to take care and think about. One of them is information security and secure code which affects the product and its users. There are different ways to learn information security and how to create secure and quality code and this time I'll shortly go through what Secure Code Warrior Secure Code Bootcamp has to offer.

For the record other good resources I've come across are Kontras application security training for OWASP Top 10 and OWASP Top 10 API, hands-on approaches like Cyber Security Base MooC, Wargames, Hack the Box and Cybrary.

Secure Code Bootcamp

Kick-start your journey to creating more secure, quality code with Secure Code Bootcamp - our free mobile app for early-career coders.

Secure Code Bootcamp

Secure Code Warrior provides a learning platform for developers to increase their software security skills and guide each coder along their own preferred learning pathway. They have products, solutions and resources to help organization's development teams to ship quality code and also provide a free mobile app for early-career coder: Secure Code Bootcamp.

Application presents common vulnerabilities from the OWASP Top 10 and you get badges as you progress through each new challenge, unlocking new missions as your progress. It teaches you to identify vulnerable code with first short introductions and explanations for each vulnerability of how they happen and where. Each topic is presented as a mission with briefing and code inspection tasks.

OWASP Top 10 are:

The Secure Code Bootcamp covers 8 of the Top 10 list as the last two are more or less difficult to present in this gamified context, I think.

Mission briefing contains couple of minute theory lesson of the given vulnerability and teaches you what, where and how to prevent it.

After briefing you're challenged with code examples in the language you've chosen (Node.JS, Python:Django, Java:Spring, C# .NET: MVC). You practically swipe your way through code reviews by accepting or rejecting them. Reading code on mobile device screen isn't optimal but suffices for the given task. Works better for Node.js than for Java Spring.

Code inspection isn't always as easy as you would think even if you know what to look for. After succesfully inspected couple of codes you're awarded with a badge. The briefing tells you what to look for in the code but sometimes it's a guess what is asked for. The code inspection requires sometimes knowledge of the used framework and inspection is done without context for the usage. Almost every inspection I got 1 wrong which gave me 75% accuracy.

Summary

The approach to teaching security topics this way works ok if you're code oriented. You'll learn the OWASP Top 10 in practice by short theory lessons with pointers to how to prevent them and test your code inspection skills for noticing vulnerable aspects of code fragments. Having swiped through the bootcamp the code inspection parts were not always so useful.

The marketing text says "progress along multiple missions and build secure coding skills." and "Graduate with fundamental secure coding skills for your next step as a coder." and that is in my opionion a bit much to say. The bootcamp teaches the basic concepts of vulnerabilities and how they look on code but doesn't teach you to code securily.

In overall the Secure Code Bootcamp for OWASP Top 10 vulnerabilities is a good start for learning what, where, how and why vulnerabilities exists and learn to identify them. You can do the bootcamp with different languages available so replayability value is good.

Short notes on tech 28/2021

Week 28 of 2021

CSS

CSS system colors
"Jim Nielsen reveals the system colors we can use in CSS and how useful this can be for light and dark mode themes." (from WDRL)

Cloud

The Gamer Guide to Playing Amazon Web Services (AWS)
"This is such a nice article, sharing a getting started guide for AWS, in a similar style to the getting started guides that many experienced MMORPG players write for new players." (from Cloud Security Reading List)

Best practices for securing Identity and Access Management on AWS
"Post looking at different approaches to help keep IAM configuration tidy, auditable and right-sized." (from Cloud Security Reading List)

Uncomplicate Security for developers using Reference Architectures
"Walk through some of the salient features of a meaningful security reference architecture and the process required to develop one." (from Cloud Security Reading List)

Software development

A curated list of books on Software Architecture

Starting with React Native and Expo

For some time I've wanted to experiment with React Native and mobile development outside native iOS but there has always been something on the way to get really started with it. Recently I had time to watch React Europe 2020 conference talks and "On Expo and React Native Web" by Evan Bacon got me inspired.

All the talks in React Europe 2020 can be found in their playlist on Youtube

Universal React with Expo

Expo is an open-source platform for making universal native apps for Android, iOS, and the web with JavaScript and React.

Expo

"Expo: Universal React" talk showed what Expo can do and after some hassling around with Expo init templates I got a React Native app running on iOS for reading news articles from REST API with theme-support and some navigation written with TypeScript. And it also worked on Android, Web and as a PWA.

Expo is a toolchain built around React Native to help you quickly start an app. It provides a set of tools that simplify the development and testing of React Native app and arms you with the components of users interface and services that are usually available in third-party native React Native components. With Expo you can find all of them in Expo SDK.

Understanding Expo for React Native

You can use the Expo Snack online editor to run you code in iOS, Android and Web platforms. And if you need vector icons, there's and app for searching them. Also Build icon app is crafty.

Expo has good documentation to get you started and following the documentation (and choosing the managed workflow when initing an app) you get things running on your device or on iOS and Android simulators. If you don't have a macOS or iPhone you can use their Snack playground to see how it looks on iOS.

Expo comes with a client which you can use to send the app to your device or to others for review which is very useful when testing as you can see all changes in code in Expo client without creating apk or ipa files.

One great feature of Expo is that you can quickly test and show examples of solutions with the Snack editor and run the code either on the integrated simulator or on your device.

I've previously quickly used Ignite which has a different approach to get you running and compared to that Expo is more of a platform than just tools which has it's good and not so good points. One of the main points of Expo is that it practically binds you to Expo and their platform where as if you use only tools you're "more free".

Drawbacks

The "Understanding Expo for React Native" post lists the following drawbacks in managed workflow. Some of those can be work aroud with bare workflow or with ejecting but then you lose the advantages of Expo workflow:

  1. Can't add native modules written in Objective-C, Swift, Java, Kotlin
  2. Can't use packages with native languages that require linking
  3. App has a big size as it is built with all Expo SDK solutions
  4. Often everything works well in Expo client but problems may occur in a standalone app.

Feelings

This far I've just started with Expo and getting more adjusted to React Native and writing Highlakka news client has been insightful and good experience when comparing the same app, "Highkara", written in Swift for iOS. My plan is to implement some of the features in Highlakka as in Highkara and see how it works as an universal app. Especially the PWA is interesting option and Over the Air updates with Expo as shown in React Europe 2020 talk.

The Hailakka app is now "usable" and iOS app builds nicely with Expo Turtle. The PWA runs on Netlify which is great.

Tools

What about tools to help you with React Native development? Basically you can just use VS Code and go on with it.

Flipper DevTool Platform for React Native talk at React Europe 2020 by Michel Weststrate and "Flipper — A React Native revolution" post shows one option. It's baked into React Native v0.62 but isn't yet available with Expo 41 (there's feature request for it and suggestions to use what Expo offers like React Native debugger and Redux devTools integration).

Build tools

Expo provides tools for building your application and Expo Dashboard shows your builds and their details. You can download the IPA packaged app when the build is ready and then upload it to App Store Connect.

You can build your application to different platforms with Expo cli. For example PWA with expo build:web and iOS with expo build:ios. And you can also do it from CI. Of course you still need Apple account for submitting the app to the App Store.

While your build is running you can check the queue from Turtle.